Russian sex of 18 year olds

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Russian sex of 18 year olds

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Russian sex of 18 year olds

For five-year-olds! So much for an age of innocence. Teenagers can legally drive a car when they are 17, but we wouldn’t dream of starting to teach them how to do it when they are five. So why is it suddenly different when it comes to sex? Answer: it isn’t. Five-year-olds — in common with six, seven and eight-year-olds — are simply not emotionally ready for this sort of information. Their bodies aren’t ready for sex and nor are their minds. It plays no part in their lives and that, in my opinion, is exactly how it should stay. They should be taking an innocent pleasure in the wonderful world around them; not having it painstakingly explained why their little friend Katie has two mums. And it doesn’t stop at five. Psychologists and teachers know the years from seven to 11 are a wonderful time for teaching children. They’re so interested in everything — making things, forming friendships, joining activity clubs and developing skills in music, art, sport, language, cookery, and competitive games. They do not want — and do not need — to be distracted by the adolescent and adult preoccupation with sex. However, education and social welfare experts disagree, despite a change of government that many hoped would produce a change of thinking on sex education in schools. Unfortunately, there’s precious little sign of that. Where a Labour administration routinely handed out condoms and morning-after pills in secondary schools, now the Coalition condones picture books explaining how ‘dad’s penis moves gently inside mum’s vagina’ and how, sometimes, ‘boys become curious about other boys’. The big question, of course, is why this sort of material is being given to our five to 11-year-olds, and I suspect the answer — despite the change in administration — will be the same. Social policy makers remain obsessed with bringing down Britain’s notoriously high rate of teenage pregnancy and believe, despite a growing body of evidence to the contrary, that more sex education is the answer. Lessons for five-year-olds are only the start of an educational process that sees our children positively bombarded with sex education. Twenty years ago, it might have been a couple of lessons added on to a reproduction topic being taught to 14-year-olds in biology. Aren`t these pictures of different positions, cartoons of masturbation, orgasm and sexuality a step too far? Now, it never stops — experts at Unesco (the UN Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation) have drafted for us one sex education curriculum for five to eight-year-olds, another for nine to 12-year-olds and a third to cover the ages of 12 to 15. And what is the unsurprising consequence of teaching children about sex at a younger and younger age? They go and try it out at a younger and younger age, leading to more pregnancies among very young teenagers and higher rates of sexually transmitted diseases. In short, precisely the opposite of what the policy-makers — and the governments that appointed them — set out to achieve. Even the very modest fall in teenage pregnancies that has been reported in the past couple of years seems to be linked to a rise in early terminations — and I’d hardly call that progress. Not only has the vast increase in the amount of sex education — and the repeated lowering of the age at which it is introduced — failed to achieve its aims, but it also completely ignores the emotional damage it could be doing to many of our children. Children grow up at different speeds and in different ways. Some, unfortunately, may have seen pornographic images on the internet by the time they are seven; others may have been brought up by parents who carefully monitor what they are exposed to. And yet sex education classes inevitably mean treating all of them the same. But it is parents who best understand what their children need to know — and when — not people with improbable ideas about education, and certainly not government ministers. Yes, I realise that talking to your children about sex can be a little embarrassing and there’s always that moment of slight horror when a child realises that their own parents must have done it at least once. But good parents can help even the most prudish child get over that little hiccup. Good parents can talk about sex with humour and sensitivity and place it in the sort of loving — and, indeed, cultural or religious — context that is completely absent from most modern sex education. But successive governments seem to have forgotten that most parents are good parents, and instead they treat us all as feckless idiots whose failure to educate our children is directly linked to Britain’s high number of teenage pregnancies. That’s why increasing the amount of sex education has no effect on the problem. The epidemic of teenage pregnancies is linked far more closely to a complex range of social factors — namely the breakdown of the traditional family unit, the tax penalties faced by married couples, and housing policies and a benefits system that make single parenthood attractive. These problems will not be solved by increasing the amount of sex education taught in schools. I do worry about the long-term damage that is being done. Our children are inundated with the information they supposedly need to get through their teenage years — sexual names, positions, techniques — while almost no emphasis is placed on such qualities as love and fidelity and the long-term sexual well-being of an individual. It’s well established that over-exposure to pornography desensitises an individual, and I’m convinced that too much sex education could have a similarly damaging effect on children. For the little boy and girl whose sex education begins when they were five, the question of what they will be like at 15 — after nearly ten years of sex education — is worrying enough. But what will they be like at 25, 35, 45? For all their sexual expertise, will they have any idea of how to nurture a warm, loving and monogamous relationship over several decades? Sex education in this country needs to be completely over-hauled, not least because if the educationalists’ fashionable theories do turn out to be wrong this blanket approach will have damaged an entire generation. Sex education needs to be taken out of primary schools altogether and responsibility for it should be handed back to parents. Children, after all, belong to their parents; they are not the property of the state. We need to stop assuming that early sexual activity is inevitable and accept that too much sex education — delivered too early — might actually be encouraging it. Only then will we be able to get back to the really important thing: letting children be children. They’ll grow up quite fast enough as it is. Brenda Almond is author of The Fragmenting Family.

People participate in a Birthright Israel trip in 2012. LUQUX/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS PHOTO Young people who thought they’d missed their chance at a Birthright Israel experience are getting a second kick at the can. Birthright Israel announced last December that a new program aimed at people aged 27 to 32 will be launched in 2018. Canada Israel Experience (CIE), which organizes Birthright Israel trips from Canada, will see its first trip depart on June 27. Applicants can sign up at israelforfree.com . Altogether, 40 young adults will be making the flight to Israel, a far cry from the 2,000 who, on average, have visited the Jewish state from Canada through the program each of the last few years. “The itinerary will be similar to our relatively new, seven-day program for the last two years, with certain adaptations for this age group, including more free time and content that is suitable for young professionals,” said Noam Arbel, program director of CIE, an arm of Jewish Federations of Canada – UIA. Participants will visit the Golan, Jerusalem, the Dead Sea and Tel Aviv, along with some young Israelis, who will spend the entire week with the Canadian visitors, Arbel said. Like the Birthright Israel trip enjoyed by those aged 18 to 26, the new trip is designed to enhance participants’ Jewish identity and “connect with their roots, communities and Israel, precisely at the time they are making important life decisions,” Arbel said. Similar-aged cohorts from other countries will be visiting Israel at the same time as the Canadian group, he added. The idea behind the expansion is to continue to appeal to wider segments of the Jewish community, Arbel continued. Over the years, Birthright Israel has expanded its programming to appeal to a variety of niche markets, including LGBTQ participants, whose visit coincides with Israel’s Pride parade, a “recharge body and soul program” aimed at those seeking a spiritual experience, extreme activities for those looking for something a little more physically demanding and a Birthright Plus program, in which participants extend their stay and focus on areas that appeal to them, such as environmental sustainability, he said. Participants take part in the first ever LGBTQ Birthright Israel trip in Canada June. CANADA ISRAEL EXPERIENCE PHOTO “The objectives and projected benefits of the program are in line with Birthright Israel’s mission to give every Jewish young adult from around the world – especially the unaffiliated – the opportunity to visit Israel on an educational trip,” Arbel said. As for the older group, Arbel said that, “Young adults of the 21st century tend to postpone important life decisions. And, even more so, postpone acting upon them. Studies have shown that these life decisions include elements such as marriage at a later age and the way in which they raise children – two elements that are constantly being researched on behalf of Birthright Israel, in order to assess impact of the program on Jewish communities.” “We want to reach out to those who didn’t get a chance to participate in Brithright Israel and who are still interested, or to reach those who may wish they’d have gone earlier and are now considering their Jewish identity,” Arbel stated. Birthright Israel – which is funded by the government of Israel, private philanthropists and community organizations – enjoyed its most successful year in its 18-year history in 2017, with nearly 48,000 participants from around the world taking part in the program. Since 1999, more than 600,000 young adults from 67 countries have taken advantage of the trip, which is offered free of charge to those aged 18 to 26.

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